Signs to Observe in Ragdoll Cats for Urgent Care

Ragdoll Cats pic

Ragdoll Cats
Image: ehow.com

Dr. Jennifer Creed has more than 15 years of emergency veterinary medicine experience and more than five years of general practice experience. She most recently worked at Emergency Veterinary Services in Lisle, Illinois. Involved with the treatment and rescue of purebred cats, Dr. Jennifer Creed is especially attuned to the needs of ragdoll cats.

Typically a bigger cat with males reaching 20 pounds and females around 10 to 15 pounds, ragdolls are affectionate cats who tend to get along with people, including kids, and dogs. These cats reach full size when they turn four years old. Their striking blue eyes make them stand out, and they have a semi-longhaired coat that comes in six colors and four patterns.

According to the Aubrey Animal Medical Center, there are some signs ragdoll cat owners should pay attention to when caring for their pet. If the cat shows any of the following signs, the pet owner should take seek immediate medical care.

* Cloudiness or redness in the eyes

* Excessive scratching or shaking the head or ears

* Sudden hind leg weakness or paralysis

* Weakness or rapid breathing

* Inability to urinate or discolored urine

Health Concerns for Ragdoll Cats

Ragdoll Cats pic

Ragdoll Cats
Image: ehow.com

An experienced veterinarian, Dr. Jennifer Creed offers particular expertise in the health problems of purebred cats. Dr. Jennifer Creed also owns Midwest Ragdolls, a Traditional Cat Association (TCA) Supreme Cattery of Excellence, and has been in two books about ragdoll cats.

Sturdy of build and generally healthy, the lovable and affectionate ragdoll cat can live for 12 to 15 years in the family home. However, the breed is prone to a number of health problems of which owners should be aware, so that they can seek out treatment.

Ragdoll cats can get bladder stones and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a thickening of the cardiac muscle. As this thickening occurs, the exterior wall of the heart becomes thicker and the muscle cannot contract normally, thus preventing adequate blood flow. There is no cure for HCM, but symptoms are controllable with medication.

Ragdoll cats may also have a higher risk of feline mucopolysaccharidosis, a genetic condition that can lead to joint damage and vision problems. Unlike HCM, this condition is treatable. Therapies include bone marrow transplantation and replacement of the arysulfatase B enzyme, a deficiency of which causes the condition.

Health Challenges in Ragdoll Cats

 

Ragdoll Cats pic

Ragdoll Cats
Image: vetinfo.com

Dr. Jennifer Creed, a veterinarian located in Elburn, Illinois, is also a licensed breeder of ragdoll cats. Kittens from Dr. Jennifer Creed’s cattery are well cared for and guaranteed for three years to be free from congenital defects or heart disease.

Ragdolls are healthy cats in general. However, some of them, like other breeds, develop bladder stones or a heart disease known as hypertropic cardiomyopathy. This disease begins with a thickening of the left ventricle wall as the cat grows older. Symptoms include depression, lethargy, low appetite, trouble with breathing or gagging, and fainting. Medications can ease these, but there is no cure.

Less severe problems are associated with the ragdoll’s long hair. If not brushed daily or every other day, the hair can become matted, leading to dirt and oils irritating the skin. Insufficient brushing can also cause hairballs.

Another issue for ragdolls is the lack of a particular enzyme that affects mobility and vision. This condition, called feline mucopolysaccharidosis, makes itself known by causing difficulty in your pet’s walking and seeing.

All About Ragdoll Cats

Ragdoll Cats pic

Ragdoll Cats
Image: ehow.com

Dr. Jennifer Creed has many years of experience as a veterinarian and vet tech. Her current hobby and interest is in the breeding and rescuing of Ragdoll cats. Through her experience with these special cats, Dr. Jennifer Creed has gained knowledge and expertise in the treatment and handling of felines.

Ragdoll cats are unique because of their close relationship to the humans in their lives. While many cats may seem uninterested in their owners, ragdoll cats have been known to follow their humans around and can even be trained to do tricks like fetching objects. The name “ragdoll” was assigned to this breed because of the cats’ tendency to go limp in their owners’ arms when content. The breed is generally known for being good-natured, gentle, and affectionate.

Ragdoll cats are also very beautiful animals. They are a longhaired variety of cat, and typically have bright blue eyes, with long white or light fur and darker points. Points refer to the cat’s ears, nose, tail and paws, which are often a darker grey or brown than the rest of the body. Despite their longer hair, Ragdolls don’t require much more grooming than other cats.

Overall, the Ragdoll breed of cat is an excellent choice for any individual wanting a cuddly, friendly companion. Ragdolls typically get along well with other pets, even dogs, and have been known to enjoy traveling with their owners.